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Archive 2013

January

Support after suicide group

The primary aim of the group is to provide and foster mutual support for those bereaved after suicide. We do this through sharing our stories, the pain of loss, the things that frustrate, annoy or help us to cope with living without the person we love. The abrupt ending of a life by suicide leaves special scars on those left behind. For some people, being with others who have a common experience can be helpful.

Venue: Fife Room, RSL Club, Dobbs Street, Wagga Wagga

If you are coming for the first time please ring Nola, Sandra/David, Val or Margaret so that we can keep an eye out for you or meet you in the foyer and sign you into the Club if you are not a member.

Contacts:
If you need to talk to someone, the following people are more than happy to offer support and a listening ear. It may be around the time of an anniversary or it might just be one of those days when it is all too hard.

Nola Baker – 6922 4438
David & Sandra Schulz – 6922 3823
Val Vearing – 6922 5520
Margaret Langfield – 6926 1177

Dates for your diary:

Friday, 12th April, 2013, 12.00 noon – Meeting Room 1
Wednesday, 8th May, 2013, 6.00pm – Fife Room
Friday, 14th June, 2013, 12.00 noon – Meeting Room 1
Wednesday, 10th July, 2013, 6.00pm – Fife Room
Friday, 9th August, 2013, 12.00 noon – Meeting Room 1
Wednesday, 11th September, 2013, 6.00pm – Fife Room
Friday, 11th October, 2013, 12.00 noon – Meeting Room 1
Wednesday, 13th November, 2013, 6.00pm – Fife Room
Friday, 13th December, 2013, 12.00 noon – Meeting Room 1

The Fife Room is situated in the front section of the RSL Club. Walk past the side of the Chinese Restaurant in the foyer area, down the stairs, turn left and walk through the double doors. Check with reception in the front foyer if you have difficulty locating the Group – sometimes we are moved to a different room at the last minute (there is a board behind the Reception Desk – our Group and meeting venue is on it).

The Support After Suicide Group is attached to Friends of Sunflower House
4 The Esplanade, Wagga Wagga NSW 2650
Phone 6931 8770 or 0422 371 322 – Fax 6931 8771

 

Support after suicide group

The primary aim of the group is to provide and foster mutual support for those bereaved after suicide. We do this through sharing our stories, the pain of loss, the things that frustrate, annoy or help us to cope with living without the person we love. The abrupt ending of a life by suicide leaves special scars on those left behind. For some people, being with others who have a common experience can be helpful.

Venue: Meeting Room 1, RSL Club, Dobbs Street, Wagga Wagga If you are coming for the first time please ring Nola, Sandra/David, Val or Margaret so that we can keep an eye out for you or meet you in the foyer and sign you into the Club if you are not a member. Contact People: If you need to talk to someone, the following people are more than happy to offer support and a listening ear. It may be around the time of an anniversary or it might just be one of those days when it is all too hard. Nola Baker – 6922 4438 David & Sandra Schulz – 6922 3823 Val Vearing – 6922 5520 Margaret Langfield – 6926 1177 Dates for your diary: Wednesday, 10th July, 2013, 6.00pm – Fife Room Friday, 9th August, 2013, 12.00 noon – Meeting Room 1 Wednesday, 11th September, 2013, 6.00pm – Fife Room Friday, 11th October, 2013, 12.00 noon – Meeting Room 1 Wednesday, 13th November, 2013, 6.00pm – Fife Room Friday, 13th December, 2013, 12.00 noon – Meeting Room 1 The Fife Room is situated in the front section of the RSL Club. Walk past the side of the Chinese Restaurant in the foyer area, down the stairs, turn left and walk through the double doors. Check with reception in the front foyer if you have difficulty locating the Group – sometimes we are moved to a different room at the last minute (there is a board behind the Reception Desk – our Group and meeting venue is on it). The Support After Suicide Group is attached to Friends of Sunflower House 4 The Esplanade, Wagga Wagga NSW 2650 Phone 6931 8770 or 0422 371 322 – Fax 6931 8771

February

Vale Joe Howard

The committee, friends and supporters of Riverina Bluebell have been deeply saddened by news of the death of Joe Howard in a water skiing accident last week. Joe was a dedicated supporter of Riverina Bluebell. His death is a great loss to family, friends and to the community.

Goodbye, Joe
The Daily Advertiser, 2 March 2013
» Read story

Donations to Riverina Bluebell are being accepted in lieu of flowers – Acknowledgements

 

Brave Jenna shares her story

The Area News
20 February 2013

BEAUTIFUL, confident and capable, Jenna Thornton knows that the world is her oyster.

But she didn’t always feel that way.

The 19-year-old understands what it’s like to be gripped by dark depression, hitting rock bottom three years ago when she ended up in hospital on suicide watch.

“I was severely bullied at high school,” Miss Thornton said.

“I even moved schools but I found I was the odd one out and felt really alone. Things just got worse for me.

“I had food scraps thrown at me, name calling and doors were slammed in my face so I couldn’t get into the classroom, then teachers would get angry at me for being late.

“I’d go home and take it out on my poor mum and then refuse to go back to school for weeks on end. I’d stay in bed the whole time. She’d bring me food and check I was still breathing.”

The brave young woman, who recently started a traineeship at a local real estate agent, will be there when the Headspace for Griffith petitions are handed over to MP Michael McCormack tomorrow.

She believes Griffith is in dire need of a Headspace centre, where young people aged 12 to 25 can turn to for help.

“It would be a great step forward for Griffith if we had one here,” she said.

“I had to get to the stage where I was hospitalised before I got help. Before that I had doctors tell me that it was just a stage I was going through and friends who said I should just suck it up.

“I was told to ring a hotline. I felt like no one cared.”

Miss Thornton hopes by sharing her story she can help break down some of the barriers surrounding mental illness.

“It’s like you are in a big hole trying to get out but people keep kicking you back down,” she said.
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“I finally got help when Mum contacted the Black Dog Institute and I had inpatient treatment in Sydney.

“When I saw the petitions for a Headspace around Griffith I got in touch with the organisers of the campaign. I’m really passionate about this. I don’t want others to have to go through what I did, feeling like there was no where to turn.

“I know that most people are ashamed to admit they have a problem, but there really is no need to suffer in silence. I still have my bad days, but I now have tools to help deal with them and I try and surround myself with positive people.”

 

Headspace campaign taking off

Jenna Thornton (right) hands the petition for a Griffith headspace mental health support service to Riverina MP Michael McCormack on Friday
The Daily Advertiser
Saturday 23 February 2013

da23feb13AFTER months of campaigning, Griffith’s push for much-needed youth mental health support took a massive leap forward yesterday.

Nineteen-year-old Jenna Thornton, who has struggled with mental illness as a result of bullying and bravely shared her story with her community this week, handed the headspace for Griffith petitions containing 2355 signatures over to Riverina MP Michael McCormack.

Mr McCormack will now pass them on to the petitions committee, asking for it to be the first order of business on the first week back in Parliament.

Griffith mayor John Dal Broi said with young people accounting for more than 10 per cent of the city’s community, headspace would be a welcome addition.

“A significant rate of young people experience a mental health issue, so it is important we have early intervention services available for them,” he said.

“The headspace ‘one stop’ model has proven to be effective worldwide as it builds on existing services strengthening local partnerships.

“There are significant difficulties for young people in our area accessing appropriate mental health support services. Since headspace in Wagga opened more than 300 young people from Griffith have made the journey over to access their services.”

Mr McCormack said having face-to-face contact could make the difference between life and death.

“Two thousand signatures is a great start and, while I can’t predict how the government might react, I will do my level best to do whatever I can to make this happen,” he said.
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“This is a sterling effort, a courageous effort, not only to collect the signatures, but to have people sharing their personal stories.”

Seventy of the 90 headspace sites available have been either established or announced, leaving 20 still to be allocated. headspace 4 Griffith committee president Peta Dummett said Griffith is among the 25 locations that will be considered based on the criteria of population and/or proximity to an existing headspace site.

“On size, Griffith and surrounding towns rank 15th largest of the 25,” she said. “Looking at distance to an existing headspace site we rank 10th in lack of proximity to a headspace site and based on this Griffith should be very much in the mix.”

– The Area  News

Mental health workshop

Carers NSW invites you to attend one of three FREE workshops being held in Wagga Wagga on 28 February and 1 March 2013.

The Hope Education and Recovery Tools (HEaRT) workshops discuss understanding and managing the risks of untreated serious mental illness.

The workshops are for consumers, carers, families and friends of people living with mental illness and mental health community managed organsiations.

Venue: RJ Hall Room, Commercial Club, 77 Gurwood Street, Wagga Wagga.

Register online or call 02-9280 4744

Carer workshop
9.30am – 12.30pm, Thursday 28 February 2013

Consumer workshop
1.30pm – 4.30pm, Thursday 28 February 2013

Service provider workshop
9.30am-12.30pm, Friday 1 March 2013

Riverina Bluebell Cup – Farrer League

Northern Jets v Marrar at Ardlethan

 

Riverina Bluebell Cup – Riverina Football League

Leeton v Narrandera at Leeton

MHM_2011Mental Health Month

Each year the Mental Health Association of NSW produces resources and provides small grants to help celebrate Mental Health Month in October.

Resources will be available in June 2013.

World Mental Health Day

whoDepression affects more than 350 million people of all ages, in all communities, and is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease. Although there are known effective treatments for depression, access to treatment is a problem in most countries and in some countries fewer than 10% of those who need it receive

 

I had a black dog, his name was depression

Published on 2 Oct 2012

At its worst, depression can be a frightening, debilitating condition. Millions of people around the world live with depression. Many of these individuals and their families are afraid to talk about their struggles, and don’t know where to turn for help. However, depression is largely preventable and treatable. Recognizing depression and seeking help is the first and most critical towards recovery.

In collaboration with WHO to mark World Mental Health Day, writer and illustrator Matthew Johnstone tells the story of overcoming the “black dog of depression”.

For more information on World Mental Health Day, please visit:

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/events

March

STOP for schizophrenia

In the next five to 10 years there could be a blood test to accurately diagnose schizophrenia, which will help doctors to detect the illness earlier and improve treatment outcomes, leading to better quality of life and continued employment for the diagnosed.

Help us get there.

Fitzy & Wippa, Bondi Rescue lifeguards Kerrbox, Corey and Maxi, Marcia Hines, Dee Madigan from The Gruen Transfer and Angry Anderson are asking everyday Australians to sign up to STOP for Schizophrenia and raise money for schizophrenia research.

STOP for Schizophrenia asks people to give up something to help raise awareness and much needed funds for the Schizophrenia Research Institute.

Registrations are now open at http://www.stopfor.com.au. Sign up now, then give up coffee, chocolate, swearing, online shopping or alcohol during Schizophrenia Awareness Week, May 13-19 and be sure to invite all your friends, colleagues and family to sponsor you for the week.

STOP for Schizophrenia will help increase community awareness and funds for an illness that has no cure and relies on new, improved treatments which are urgently needed.

The Schizophrenia Research Institute has a team of around 140 scientists and researchers working hard to find what causes schizophrenia, how we can better treat it and, ultimately, how it can be cured, because far too many people are affected by this chronic illness. Roughly one in 100 young Australians have or will develop schizophrenia and it will hit them at an age when their lives are really starting to take off – in their late teens to early 20s.

The Schizophrenia Research Institute has had some exciting breakthroughs in the past year, including finding schizophrenia indicators in the bloodstream and links between schizophrenia and the immune system. These are the kind of breakthroughs that makes headlines internationally and it’s all being discovered right here in Australia.

We encourage all Australians to become part of the fight and to sign up to STOP! for schizophrenia.

A few facts about schizophrenia:

  • Schizophrenia is the third leading cause of disability in young people.
  • One in 100 young Australians have or will develop schizophrenia – it robs them of a normal future – an education, career and future relationships.
  • Fifty per cent will attempt suicide.
  • Schizophrenia affects not only the people diagnosed with the condition, but their families, friends and the community at large. Symptoms include retreat from reality, with delusion formation and hallucinations. Social isolation becomes an ongoing problem and the emotional impact on families can be devastating.
  • In addition to the profound emotional cost to families, schizophrenia costs the Australian community approximately $2.6 billion per annum in both direct health costs and loss of productivity; 85 percent of sufferers receive welfare benefits.
  • Schizophrenia can arise in any family.
  • Current treatments need improvement and there is no cure.
  • The Schizophrenia Research Institute is the only medical research institute solely focused on discovering what causes schizophrenia, and how to prevent and cure it.

Symptoms of schizophrenia:

  • Confused thinking
  • Delusions
  • Hallucinations
  • Flat affect (a person’s face does not move or he or she talks in a dull or monotonous voice)
  • Lack of pleasure in everyday life
  • Lack of ability to begin and sustain planned activities
  • Speaking little, even when forced to interact
  • Poor decision-making skills
  • Trouble focussing or paying attention

For more information, visit http://www.schizophreniaresearch.org.au

STOP for schizophrenia press release (1) | DOC 42kb

 

Disordered Perceptions – solo exhibition Griffithcaleb-260w

Caleb Arcifa is a local HSC student and artist studying at Wade High School in Griffith. In late 2012 he attended the Riverina BluebellUnderstanding depression and resilience seminar with Matthew Johnstone. This provided inspiration for a series of photographic works on mental and physical disorders.

Caleb’s solo exhibition is entitled “Disordered perceptions.” His aim is to raise awareness of the complexity of certain disorders, but also the lack of services and support for mental health patients in regional towns such as Griffith.

Griffith City Council Foyer
Monday 15 April – Friday 17 May 2013

Caleb starts his art journey early

The Area News
March 2013
caleb-72dpi

 

Disordered Perceptions – solo exhibition Griffith

Caleb Arcifa is a local HSC student and artist studying at Wade High School in Griffith. In late 2012 he attended the Riverina BluebellUnderstanding depression and resilience seminar with Matthew Johnstone. This provided inspiration for a series of photographic works on mental and physical disorders.

Caleb’s solo exhibition is entitled “Disordered perceptions.” His aim is to raise awareness of the complexity of certain disorders, but also the lack of services and support for mental health patients in regional towns such as Griffith.

Griffith Regional Theater Artspace
Monday 11 March – Friday 12 April 2013

Griffith City Council Foyer
Monday 15 April – Friday 17 May 2013

 

Goodbye, Joe

The Daily Advertiser
2 March 2013

JoeHoward-funeralGOODBYE, GOOD FRIEND: Pall bearers Dave Howard, Ben Howard, Linc Murdoch, Nick Fahy, Steve Hibbard and Mark Booker carry Joe Howard’s (pictured, inset) casket following his funeral yesterday. Picture: Michael Frogley

JOE Howard celebrated 34 years of life and made every minute count as a dedicated father, husband, brother, son and community man.

A respected member of the community, Joe was farewelled by hundreds of mourners who spilled out onto the steps of St John’s Anglican Church yesterday.

His smart aleck, larrikin ways were described to mourners in eulogies presented by four of his closest family members and friends, including his mother Barbara Baikie, who said Wagga and the world would be a little dimmer following his sudden death.

Painting a picture of the way many remembered him best, she said he loved nothing more than his wife Mel and their children.

“One of my last memories of Joe was seeing him walk in the door from work and doing tricks with his kids,” she said.

“This meant the kids would all run and jump up into his arms and give him a kiss.

“Every birthday party for his kids, there was always a fun castle, a treasure hunt and Joe dressing up.

“He was Harry Potter, a pirate, a knight in shining armour, Buzz Lightyear and Woody.

“The kids loved it and so did Joe – he was the biggest kid of all.”

Joe’s passions also extended to sports including football and cricket, but come summer, water skiing was the top of his list and tragically it was the sport which eventually claimed his life while skiing on Columbo Creek.

In a touching moment to her husband, Joe’s wife Melanie Howard said the proudest day of her life was the day she married her best friend.

“I will miss my Joe forever, but I will try my hardest to travel the path he pointed me in,” she said.

“I will raise and protect his children forever.

“A promise he did break to me was that he would look after me forever, but maybe now that is just in my dreams.

“I will think of you and love you always Joe, love you to the moon and back and forever and always.”

Through the tears there were moments of laughter as mourners were told of Joe’s antics, including the time he decided to keep a pet snake, smoked thistles in a bid to put his mother off the scent that he had accidentally lit the chook shed on fire and telling hotel operators he hadn’t been swimming at 3am despite being found dripping wet with his boots and clothes in his hands.

Wagga Brothers and Yanco Agricultural High School mates lined Cross Street in a guard of honour for Joe, who was buried on the family farm at Wantabadgery.

Joe grew up on the farm attending school at Lutheran, St Michael’s and then Yanco Agricultural High School.

His first job was for Byrne’s Trailers as a welder until he was offered a job as an apprentice auctioneer at Rundles Auction by Richard Allsopp.

He was later promoted to general manager.

He became active in the community raising money for local charities including Riverina Bluebell and Pillars of Strength.

Joe is survived by his wife Mel, children Dougal, Lucy and Angus.

June

Charity Football 2013

teams2013

Wagga Agricultural College and Orange City went head to head on 6th April 2013 for the annual Charity Rugby Trial.

Riverinal Bluebell has flown its flag at three Charity Football matches in 2013.

Riverina Bluebell were nominated by AFLNSWACT for the NSW Sports Federation Award for 2013. We put in a submission to the Committee, however, we were unsuccessful but Paul Habel, Football Programme Manager for AFL thought it was definitely worth the effort.This award links sport to charitable organisations like Riverina Bluebell for the benefit of the whole community. On 6th. April, a Charity Rugby Trial match between Wagga Agricultural College and Orange City teams was played, the winner was Orange City in a close game. Proceeds were divided between Riverina Bluebell and Care West at Orange. The first of the Riverina Bluebell Cup games was played at Leeton between Narrandera and Leeton, Leeton went on to retain the Cup as they had the the highest aggregate of points in the Netball and Football games. The Riverina Bluebell Cup games in the Farrer League were played between Northern Jets and Marrar at Ariah Park, the winner was Northern Jets. A sum total of $1500 was raised for Riverina Bluebell which very satisfying.However, more importantly our exposure in the smaller country towns was enhanced, the football followers and townspeople recognise the work we are doing and are grateful for our involvement to promote positive mental health outcomes in rural NSW.

 

Building the Case for Mental Health Reform in Australia: A Review of Expenditure and System Design

 Mental illness is a significant challenge in Australia. Yet despite the significant policy attention and substantial additional funding to mental health over the past two decades, the mental health and social services systems remains highly fragmented.
14conf

In 2012 Medibank commissioned the Nous Group to analyse the total direct expenditure; both health and non-health, on supporting people with mental illness, to examine the structure of the Australian system; and review domestic and international examples in which integrated approaches to mental health care and social services are able to deliver better health outcomes for consumers and improved value for payors. Total direct expenditure on supporting people with a mental illness in Australia is at least $28.6 billion per year, far exceeding previous estimates. This figure is equivalent to 2.2% of Australia’s GDP. This explicitly excludes indirect expenditure such as lost productivity. Poor system design compounds Australia’s mental health challenges and it is impossible to tell if Australia is spending the right amount of money to support people with mental illness and if this money is being spent in the right areas. New initiatives add complexity to an already fragmented system and fail to address the critical issue of system design. The fragmentation of Australia’s mental health system is replicated globally; however a review of reforms in Australia and internationally suggests some elements to inform an improved mental health service system. With mental health service provision a continuing challenge, major system level structural and funding changes are needed. Australia has an unprecedented opportunity to lead the world in system redesign, delivering better quality and outcomes at sustainable levels. Mrs Rebecca Tinning, Strategy Manager, Medibank Health Solutions will present on this review at the 14th International Mental Health Conference.

For more information on the conference and to view the program please visit http://www.anzmh.asn.au/conference
EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION CLOSES MONDAY 24 JUNE 2013. Kind Regards, Sarah Jones, Conference Secretariat 14th International Mental Health Conference: Opening Doors 5-7 August 2013 | Outrigger Resort Surfers Paradise P: 07 5502 2068 | F: 07 5527 3298

 

Open Minds Brighter Futures meeting – Temora

Date: First Wednesday of the month
Time: 5:30pm.
Venue: Salvation Army Hall, corner of Baker and Victoria St

Contact Details: Heather Hammond, mob. 0434348856

 

Open Minds Brighter Futures meeting – Temora

Date: First Wednesday of the month
Venue: CTC meeting room, NRCC House
Contact Details: Community Services Officer, Amanda Gay-McCrone, 02 6980 1100

 

Open Minds Brighter Futures meeting – Temora

Date: First Wednesday of the month
Venue: CTC meeting room, NRCC House
Contact Details: Community Services Officer, Amanda Gay-McCrone, 02 6980 1100

 

Mind is the matter at youth forum

The Daily Advertiser 1 June 2013 Young people often have plenty to say and now they’re being empowered to speak out and make a difference. It’s the focus of next week’s Wagga youth mental health forum which will unite education and mental health service providers with students from across the region, in a bid to initiate positive change through “a whole of community” approach. The forum, which will be held in the Mater Dei Primary School Hall on Tuesday, will help young people change negative perceptions of mental health and develop ways to improve communication and understanding between their peers. Students will also develop an action plan to take back to their schools in the hope to implement changes which help destigmatise the issue. Facilitated by leading youth development organisation Rising Generations, the forum has been developed by a regional steeering committee which includes representatives from Riverina headspace, NSW police, Intereach and Wagga-based parternship broker Compact. Catholic Schools Office Wagga diocese sport and wellbeing education officer Anthony Hood said it was about destigmatising a sensitive issue. “Students are so open about a lot of areas of their life, but struggle to talk about mental health and are often unaware of what resources are out there,” Mr Hood said. “The big push is to destigmatise it… to open up and talk about it and take it back to their schools.” Compact executive officer Megan Mulrooney siad the forum was initiated as a pilot last year after an increase in mental health-related issues for young people in schools was identified. “Hopefully the message will spread and empower them to make positive changes into their own school environment,” Mrs Mulrooney said.

Community consultations

Community consultations with culturally and linguistically diverse communities in rural and remote NSW You are invited to participate in the Transcultural Rural and Remote Outreach Project (TRROP) Community Consultations. The purpose of these consultations is to understand the:

  • Mental health needs of CALD communities living in Wagga Waggansw-health
  • Current services and their capacity to assist individuals and families from CALD communities in relation to mental health
  • Gaps and limitations of mental health service provision for individuals and families from CALD communities
  • Recommendations for enhancing mental health

transcult

We would like to hear from leaders from CALD communities, service providers and community workers and key stakeholders. Your feedback will provide a valuable contribution to this consultation process. These consultations will be facilitated by the Cultural and Indigenous Research Centre Australia (CIRCA), on behalf of the Transcultural Mental Health Centre. If you would like further information contact Connie Donato-Hunt at CIRCA on 02 8585 1353, or email:connie@circaresearch.com.au Date: Friday 7 June 2013 Time: 10:30am – 12:30pm (light lunch to be served afterwards)Venue: Wollundry Room, Senior Citizens Centre, 204 Tarcutta St Wagga Wagga Cost: Covered by TRROP RSVP to: Jess Willis at CIRCA ph.: 02 8585 1353 Email: jess@culper.com.au Please RSVP as soon as possible for catering purposes.

August

Open minds, brighter futures

Date: First Wednesday of the month
Time: 5:30pm.
Venue: Salvation Army Hall, corner of Baker and Victoria St

Contact Details: Heather Hammond, mob. 0434348856

September

NSW CAG and GROW – Travelling Conference: Building Communities

cag-logosVenue: Senior Citizens Centre, Tarcutta Street, Wagga Wagga

Workshops to discuss and develop:

  • Innovative ways to connect or reconnect with your communities
  • Ways to help others to connect
  • What a connected community looks like

Speakers include:

  • Deputy Commissioner of NSW – TBA
  • NSW CAG – Dr. Peri O’Shea, CEO
  • Mental Health Consumer & Carer
  • Participation Group – Matt Sainty
  • Medicare Local – Jenny Campbell

Consumers and carers, consumer workers, service providers, practitioners, managers, policy makers and other interested parties all welcome.

Cost: $99 (includes GST and catering) for other interested parties

FREE registration for Consumers and Carers.

To Register and apply for sponsored registration (if applicable) email info@nswcag.org.au Or register viahttp://www.nswcag.org.au.

This travelling conference will also be held at Parramatta (date TBA) and other NSW regional areas (TBA).

Travelling Conferences_Building Communities Rego Form Wagga Wagga UPDATED | PDF 80kb

Building Communities conference flyer 6 Wagga Wagga UPDATED | PDF 546kb

 

Hat Day – shining a light on mental health

hatdayWhat is hat day?

Friday October 11 is Hat Day, the fun-draising day where you wear a hat and make a donation to help shine a light on mental illness in Australia.

100% of money raised on the day goes to research into helping those affected by depression, anxiety, schizophrenia and many other illnesses.

Hat Day is an initiative of Australian Rotary Health, the largest non-government funder of mental illness research in Australia.

Get Involved!

 

Suicide in rural and remote areas of Australia

suicide-rrReport by Kairi Kõlves, Allison Milner, Kathy McKay & Diego De Le.

The Australian Institute for Suicide Research and Prevention National Centre of Excellence in Suicide Prevention WHO Collaborating Centre for Research and Training in Suicide Prevention Griffith University

Australia’s rural localities face an increasing burden of death due to suicide. Those groups most vulnerable to suicide appear to be males, youth, farmers and Indigenous people. Data from the Queensland Suicide Register showed that, between 2005 and 2007, male suicide rates in remote areas were signifi cantly higher than male suicide rates in non-remote areas.

While the gap is widest between metropolitan and remote suicide rates and the rates highest among rural males, regional suicide rates are still higher and metropolitan rates and the rural female suicide rate is higher than the urban female suicide rate. Examining suicide in regional and remote Australia, this report aims to provide a better understanding how the rural cultural paradigm affects suicidal behaviours so we may develop and implement appropriate and effective suicide prevention strategies. In this way, those people most vulnerable can be protected from the tragedy of suicide.

Suicide-in-Rural-and-Remote-Areas-of-Australia | PDF 5mb

 

Exercise your mood month

exercisedoggyExercise Your Mood Month is the Black Dog Institute’s annual national fundraising campaign every September to increase awareness, in the community about the importance of regular exercise for maintaining good mental health. People of all ages can participate in either an individual or group exercise throughout the month, by organising their own activity or participating in one of the Exercise Your Mood community events.

November

Call for National Mental Health Leaders

mhcaThe National Mental Health Commission is seeking nominations of Australians with lived experience of mental health issues, either as a person living with mental illness or as a primary family member other significant support person, to work with and contribute to the Commission’s mission.

In partnership with the Mental Health Council of Australia and with the support of the National Mental Health Consumer and Carer Forum, the Commission wishes to support further development of existing leaders and advocates and find the next generation of national leaders.

natmenthealth-200wAround 10 successful nominees will have the opportunity to participate in an individual mentoring and leadership development program and contribute to the National Mental Health Commission’s work. This may include co-chairing or membership of advisory groups to the Commission.

» Find out more

» Nomination kit

December

NSW town of Hay tackles suicide on its own with innovative new programs

The Daily Telegraph 25 November 2013

A SMALL Outback town in the Riverina has rallied to tackle a major problem.

Hay, nestled on the banks of the Murrumbidgee River, is known for its strong wool and irrigated crop industries.

The latest census figures show the shire has a population just a tick over 3500.

But despite its modest standing it is leading the state in a bold and innovative plan to tackle the most challenging and confronting of subjects – suicide.

In the past three years, Hay has lost eight of its townsfolk to the black dog.

» Full story